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Authors/Initiative

Elsevier,  the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS), part of Leiden University

Short Description

Open data practices facilitate collaboration, drive data analysis, and promote transparency and reproducibility. Yet the research community has not uniformly embraced open data or data sharing practices. This report describes the findings of a complementary methods approach to examine the practices, motivations, and obstacles to data sharing as well as perceived advantages among researchers across disciplines worldwide. Combining information from a bibliometric analysis, a survey and case studies, this report examines how researchers share data, the attitudes of researchers toward sharing data, and why researchers might be reticent to share data.

Author/Initiative

The list of the 38 potential contributors can found in the link provided. 

Short Description

Research is getting a global makeover, in part thanks to the power of the internet and the tools it provides for us and in part due to a growing call for accountability (e.g. reproducibility and data provenance) in science. Global policies are popping up all over that include some aspect of ‘Open Research’ or ‘Open Science’, and inclusive of all research disciplines.  

This MOOC is designed to equip students and researchers with the skills they need to excel in a modern research environment. It brings together the efforts and resources of hundreds of researchers who have all dedicated their time to making research just that little bit more awesome for us all.

Each module will comprise a complete range of resources including videos, research articles, dummy datasets and code, as well as ‘homework’ tasks to complete as individuals. Because you don’t learn how to do Open Research by reading; you learn by doing it.

Link

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1KuTSECSYHXZmZX15GDjyD65pJ90eRMhHVEZ-1trsw30/edit#heading=h.17d4hvsvykmz

 

Authors/Initiative

The Royal Society

Short Description

The Science as an open enterprise report highlights the need to grapple with the huge deluge of data created by modern technologies in order to preserve the principle of openness and to exploit data in ways that have the potential to create a second open science revolution. Exploring massive amounts of data using modern digital technologies has enormous potential for science and its application in public policy and business. The report maps out the changes that are required by scientists, their institutions and those that fund and support science if this potential is to be realised.

Author/Initiative

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Short Description

This is the last Module of the course on Open Access for researchers. So far you have studied about Open Access, its history, advantages, initiatives, copyrights and licensing, evaluation matrix for research – all in the context of scholarly communication. In this Module with just two units, we would like to help you share your work in Open Access through repositories and journals. At the end of this module, you are expected to be able to:

  • Understand the publication process involved in dissemination of scholarly works;
  • Choose appropriate Open Access journals and repositories for sharing research results;
  • Use social media to promote personal research work and build reputation. 

Link

http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002322/232211E.pdf

Authors

Mark D. Wilkinson, Michel Dumontier, IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg, Gabrielle Appleton, Myles Axton, Arie Baak, Niklas Blomberg, Jan-Willem Boiten, Luiz Bonino da Silva Santos, Philip E. Bourne, Jildau Bouwman, Anthony J. Brookes, Tim Clark, Mercè Crosas, Ingrid Dillo, Olivier Dumon, Scott Edmunds, Chris T. Evelo, Richard Finkers, Alejandra Gonzalez-Beltran, Alasdair J.G. Gray, Paul Groth, Carole Goble, Jeffrey S. Grethe, Jaap Heringa, Peter A.C ’t Hoen, Rob Hooft, Tobias Kuhn, Ruben Kok, Joost Kok, Scott J. Lusher, Maryann E. Martone, Albert Mons, Abel L. Packer, Bengt Persson, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Marco Roos, Rene van Schaik, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Erik Schultes, Thierry Sengstag, Ted Slater, George Strawn, Morris A. Swertz, Mark Thompson, Johan van der Lei, Erik van Mulligen, Jan Velterop, Andra Waagmeester, Peter Wittenburg, Katherine Wolstencroft, Jun Zhao & Barend Mons

Short Description

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders—representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers—have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measurable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, the FAIR Principles put specific emphasis on enhancing the ability of machines to automatically find and use the data, in addition to supporting its reuse by individuals. This Comment is the first formal publication of the FAIR Principles and includes the rationale behind them and some exemplary implementations in the community.

Access

Gold

Reference

Wilkinson, M. D. et al. (2016). The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship. Scientific data, 3.

DOI

doi:10.1038/sdata.2016.18

Link

https://www.nature.com/articles/sdata201618

Authors/Initiative

Richard D. Morey, Christopher D. Chambers, Peter J. Etchells, Christine R. Harris, Rink Hoekstra, Daniel Lakens, Stephan Lewandowsky, Candice Coker Morey, Daniel P. Newman, Felix D. Schonbrodt, Wolf Vanpaemel, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Rolf A. Zwaan

Short Description

Openness is one of the central values of science. Open scientific practices such as sharing data, materials and analysis scripts alongside published articles have many benefits, including easier replication and extension studies, increased availability of data for theory-building and meta-analysis, and increased possibility of review and collaboration even after a paper has been published. Although modern information technology makes sharing easier than ever before, uptake of open practices had been slow. We suggest this might be in part due to a social dilemma arising from misaligned incentives and propose a specific, concrete mechanism—reviewers withholding comprehensive review—to achieve the goal of creating the expectation of open practices as a matter of scientific principle.

Short Description

Openness and transparency are core values of science. As a manifestation of those values, a minimum requirement for publication of any scientific results must be the public submission of materials used in generating those results. As reviewers, it is our responsibility to ensure that publications meet certain minimum quality standards.

Link

https://opennessinitiative.org/

 

 

Author

Yimei Zhu

Short Description

This paper presents the findings from a survey study of UK academics and their publishing behaviour. The aim of this study is to investigate academics’ attitudes towards and practice of open access (OA) publishing. The results are based on a survey study of academics at 12 Russell Group universities, and reflect responses from over 1800 researchers. This study found that whilst most academics support the principle of making knowledge freely available to everyone, the use of OA publishing among UK academics was still limited despite relevant established OA policies. The results suggest that there were differences in the extent of OA practice between different universities, academic disciplines, age and seniorities. Academics’ use in OA publishing was also related to their awareness of OA policy and OA repositories, their attitudes towards the importance of OA publishing and their belief in OA citation advantage. The implications of these findings are relevant to the development of strategies for the implementation of OA policies. 

Access

Open

Reference

Zhu, Y. (2017). Who support open access publishing? Gender, discipline, seniority and other factors associated with academics’ OA practice. Scientometrics, 111(2), 557-579.

DOI

10.1007/s11192-017-2316-z

Link

http://www.olt.gov.au/system/files/The%20D-Cubed%20guide%20-%20web%20and%20email%20version.pdf