Short description

Github

Github

  • Description/functions: Generic software repository. It supports software sharing, re-use and collaboration among users. Thanks to the integration with Zenodo and figshare, persistent identifiers can be assigned to software release.
  • Support for peer reviewing the research flow: No peer review policies. By making source code available from github, researchers can share their research software with a wide audience (not only colleagues or other researchers). Software re-use and modification are automatically traced (as number of downloads and git forks).
  • Remarks: Github is not a scholarly communication -oriented tool. Software on github is not scientifically nor technically assessed.
  • Link
Zenodo

Zenodo

  • Description/functions: Generic repository for research products of any types. Products can be updated and versioned to follow the advancements of the research flow. DOIs also support versioning.
  • Support for peer reviewing the research flow: Deposited products are technically assessed and checked for compliance according to the Zenodo deposition guidelines and FAIR principles.
  • Remarks: Zenodo is a “catch-all” repository for research, where users can deposit research products of different types: literature, datasets, software, presentations, lessons, videos, images, and software. In May 2017, 15,358 research software products have been deposited in Zenodo.
  • Link
figshare

figshare

  • Description/functions: Generic repository for research products of any types.
  • Support for peer reviewing the research flow: Figshare curators verify that the deposited files are academic content. Datacite guidelines are automatically checked upon deposition, when the user is asked to complete a form to fill in metadata information about the research product.
  • Remarks: figshare is a “catch-all” repository for research, where users can deposit research products of different types: literature, figures, datasets, media, code, posters, presentations and filesets (groups of files).
  • Link
CRAN

CRAN

  • Description/functions: The Comprehensive R Archive Network hosts the R package repository. Research software can be deposited if considered useful to a wider audience.
  • Support for peer reviewing the research flow: Deposition policies address credit, legal, technical and documentation concerns.
  • Remarks: CRAN is not a research software repository, but hosts software that is useful to researchers, often implemented by researchers.
  • Link
PyPI

PyPI

  • Description/functions: The Python Package Index (PyPI) is a repository for software packages written in Python language. Research software can be deposited if considered useful to a wider audience.
  • Support for peer reviewing the research flow: Deposition policies address code structure, licensing, descriptive metadata and documentation. In order to ensure that the package can be properly ingested and archived, users can first test the ingestion process on a test site.
  • Remarks: PyPI is not a research software repository, but hosts software that is useful to researchers, often implemented by researchers.
  • Link
CPAN

CPAN

  • Description/functions: CPAN is a software repository for Perl modules.
  • Support for peer reviewing the research flow: Deposition policies address technical features of the modules and define the basic metadata fields to be provided. To support Perl users in respecting the CPAN policies and to ensure high quality of the submitted modules, a dedicated web site has been set up: the PrePAN. Pre-PAN is composed of a software repository with forum capabilities where users can submit their module for review by other Perl programmers.
  • Remarks: CPAN is not a research software repository, but hosts software that is useful to researchers, often implemented by researchers.
  • Link

 

Short Description

This is a blog item, published by Welcome, which is about a new initiative that allows researchers to cite preprints in their grant applications. Central Service for Preprints allows researchers to deposit their preprints – complete and public drafts of scientific documents, not yet certified by peer review – to:

Short Description

The use of journal hierarchy for assessing the reputation of research works and their authors has contributed to a competitive environment that is having a detrimental effect on scientific reliability. Open access repositories administered by Universities or research organizations are a valuable infrastructure that could support the transition to a more collaborative and efficient scholarly evaluation and communication system. Open Scholar has coordinated a consortium of six partners to develop the first Open Peer Review Module (OPRM) for institutional repositories. The module integrates an overlay peer review service, coupled with a transparent reputation system, on top of institutional repositories. It is provided freely as open source software.

Short Description

This is a blog item, published by WIRED, which is about the story of a neuroscientist named Niko Kriegeskorte, a cognitive neuroscientist at the Medical Research Council in the UK who, since December 2015, has performed all of his peer review openly. That means he publishes his reviews as he finishes them on his personal blog—sharing on Twitter and Facebook, too—before a paper is even accepted.

Short Description

This initiative shares a vision of an independent, democratic academic evaluation model free from the conflicts of interest imposed by the agendas of journals and their commercial publishers. It aims to promote complementary strategies to comprise the ingredients needed to attain this goal and to encourage scholars and interested parties to experiment with new modes that can assist the transition to free, independent, open and transparent peer review. In addition, it considers that any platform developed to implement free and open peer review should be independent of intermediaries. To mitigate potential conflicts of interest such platforms should ideally be under the management of an open community, be open source and operate in a non-profit manner.

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